TYPE: Documents (Loose)
DIMENSIONS: 35 cm
COMPONENTS: 2p., [2] Manuscript letter, in black ink. With letterhead strip of the personal stationary of Porfirio Diaz. Signed by Diaz. With presidential seal on the second page.
CONDITION: In very good condition.
NOTES: I have seen many documents by Porfirio Diaz (not surprising considering that he was president/dictator for over 30 years), but this one is way more interesting that the rest. For starters it's about the second international American conference 1902 (proposed by the US), it´s a manuscript document, it has a strip from his personal stationary and a nice presidential seal.   This one combines the personal stationary (not present in any official document), the presidential seal, completely manuscript (official documents signed by the president in those years where almost always printed) and an interesting subject (a Pan-American Conference appointment). In conclusion, it is quite unique.
REFERENCE EXTERNAL LINKS: Alfredo Chavera Bio

ITEM ID: 3394
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Appointment for Second Pan-American Conferences

DATE
Year: 1901
Decade: 1900s
Century: 20th (1901-2000)
Notes: May 27, 1901

Porfirio Diaz signed appointment for the Second International Conference of American States held at the City of Mexico from October 22, 1901, to April 29, 1902.By present letter, Alfredo Chavero and others, were appointed by President Porfirio Diaz himself as the delegates for the Second International Conference of American States that was going to be held in Mexico City.The Conferences of American States, commonly referred to as the Pan-American Conferences, were meetings of the Pan-American Union, an international organization for cooperation on trade. James G. Blaine, a United States politician, Secretary of State and presidential contender, first proposed establishment of closer ties between the United States and its southern neighbors and proposed international conference. Blaine hoped that ties between the United States and its southern counterparts would open Latin American markets to US trade.