ORIGINAL TITLE Title: Jamakirk Hayots
TYPE: Book
COMPONENTS: 608 pages; pages 11-14 hand written
NOTES: Davtian 92
ITEM ID: 98
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Book of Hours

DATE
Year: 1806
Decade: 1800s
Century: 19th (1801-1900)

According to scholar Haig Utidjian, “This has been somewhat inaccurately described. It means Book of Hours – i.e. Breviary. It includes all the services of the Holy Armenian Church – starting with Nocturns, Matins, the Hour of Sunrise, the three Prandii, Vespers, the Greater and Lesser Compline, and very possibly but not necessarily the Divine Liturgy. It was not done “in Hortakiwgh” – yŌrt’agiwł means “in Ortakiwgh” (the preposition “i” turns into the prefix “y-” when succeeded by a word that starts with a vowel). This little book would serve you well today in any Armenian church where proper services are duly held – everything the book includes is still valid and good today.”

Scholar Sebouh Aslanian also mentions that, “A few additional notes to what you, Haig, and our friend Mihr Toumajan have so kindly posted here and elsewhere. Since I am going over the copy edits of my forthcoming book and re-reading my own work more times than I’d care to admit, here is a segment from my chapter 7 that relates directly to this zhamagirk‘ or Book of Hours/Breviary. ‘This liturgical compendium came in two forms, the small portable zhamagirk‘, called the tserats‘ zhamagirk‘, and the larger volume, the ateni zhamagirk‘. A total of sixty separate editions of this work were printed, mostly during the second half of the seventeenth and the early eighteenth centuries. The long lease of life these liturgical books enjoyed is easily explained by the fact that zhamagirk‘s were the second-most-prized book that every Armenian church was expected to possess, after the Bible. The ateni variety was required reading in church since it contained all the sermons, daily prayers, and Psalms that a priest would read during dominical services. As with the Psalters, however, we do not really know exactly how they were sold and to whom. We know that both genres were printed in large runs of two to three thousand copies. The version that Matteos Vanandets‘i printed in Amsterdam in 1685 had a print run of three thousand, and that of Oscan in Amsterdam in 1664 was several thousand.'”

ARTISTS
Name: Arabyan
Type: Printer
Artist Information: Book published in Hortakough (Ortakoy)