ORIGINAL TITLE Title: Kinka Keiransho
PRONUNCIATION: Kinka Keiransho
DIMENSIONS: 6 X 10 1/2 inches (closed)
COMPONENTS: 3 volumes bound as one; 82 pages
priceInfo: 667-670: 1350, 3000; 337, 750
ITEM ID: 1664
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork
  • Artwork

Post a comment

Christianity in Kyushu

DATE
Decade: 1700s
Century: 18th (1701-1800)

Early manuscript set on Christianity in Kyushu (Nagasaki area) and the Shimabara Rebellion, talking about the dangers of Christianity, the building of a church, about Namban (Southern Barbarians, ie. foreigners), etc.

The Shimabara Rebellion (島原の乱, Shimabara no ran), also known as the Shimabara-Amakusa Rebellion (島原・天草の乱, Shimabara-Amakusa no ran) or Shimabara-Amakusa Ikki (島原・天草一揆), was an uprising that occurred in the Shimabara Domain of the Tokugawa Shogunate in Japan from 17 December 1637 to 15 April 1638.

Matsukura Katsuie, the daimyō of the Shimabara Domain, enforced unpopular policies set by his father Matsukura Shigemasa that drastically raised taxes to construct the new Shimabara Castle and violently prohibited Christianity.

In December 1637, an alliance of local rōnin and mostly Catholic peasants led by Amakusa Shirō rebelled against the Tokugawa shogunate due to discontent over Katsuie’s policies. The Tokugawa Shogunate sent a force of over 125,000 troops supported by the Dutch to suppress the rebels and defeated them after a lengthy siege against their stronghold at Hara Castle in Minamishimabara.

Following the successful suppression of the rebellion, Shirō and an estimated 37,000 rebels and sympathizers were executed by beheading, and the Portuguese traders suspected of helping them were expelled from Japan.

Scholar Peter Kornicki mentions that this manuscript seems to be incomplete and the title should read ‘Kinka Keiransho’. It was written by Masaki Zanko and some surviving manuscript copies (it was never printed) carry a preface dated 1668.

As scholar Jim Lockhart noted, this manuscript is about the Shimabara Rebellion of 1637-38, which was an uprising of Japanese Christian peasants which was crushed and resulted in the banning of Christianity in Japan from 1640 till 1873.