MATERIAL: Paper
TYPE: Manuscript
DIMENSIONS: 305 x 210 mm
COMPONENTS: 80 leaves (plus one paper endleaf at each end); apparently complete; 25 lines in ornamental square Cyrillic bookhand; iridescent red rubrics; lines of red and black ornamental capitals opening major texts; simple small initials in same enclosing foliage sprays; larger initials in yellow with red foliage and pen work ornament; one large initial in bands of red and green with half-page long swirls of foliage terminating in yellow and green stylized foliage; (fol. 1v), frontispiece with opening text in penwork capitals set within an architectural feature formed of red boxes line-drawn pillars and surmounted by line-drawn cross surrounded by foliage and birds; the margin filled by a decorative bar with shapes and foliage mounted on it (one of these shapes with birds on its ledges); a drollery formed from a birds body and a human head with rosy cheeks and a crown atop the bar standing on its uppermost loop; later N147 and a collection label edged in blue with N178 and the apparent date 1912.
CONDITION: Some staining to edges; a few leaves with tears; coming loose from the binding in places; overall in good condition; contemporary binding of finely tooled brown leather over beveled wooden boards; two clasps; some scuffs and tears at edges, but solid in binding.
ITEM ID: 4765
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Collection of Homilies with the Life of St. Basil the Great

DATE
Year: 1830
Decade: 1830s
Century: 19th (1801-1900)

Collection of Homilies with the Life of St. Basil the Great, decorated manuscript on paper.

Basil of Caesarea, also called Saint Basil the Great (Greek: Ἅγιος Βασίλειος ὁ Μέγας, Ágios Basíleios o Mégas; Coptic: Ⲡⲓⲁⲅⲓⲟⲥ Ⲃⲁⲥⲓⲗⲓⲟⲥ; 329 or 330 – January 1 or 2, 379), was the bishop of Caesarea Mazaca in Cappadocia, Asia Minor (modern-day Turkey). He was an influential theologian who supported the Nicene Creed and opposed the heresies of the early Christian church, fighting against both Arianism and the followers of Apollinaris of Laodicea. His ability to balance his theological convictions with his political connections made Basil a powerful advocate for the Nicene position.

In addition to his work as a theologian, Basil was known for his care of the poor and underprivileged. Basil established guidelines for monastic life which focus on community life, liturgical prayer, and manual labor. Together with Pachomius, he is remembered as a father of communal monasticism in Eastern Christianity. He is considered a saint by the traditions of both Eastern and Western Christianity.

Church Slavonic, also known as Church Slavic, New Church Slavonic or New Church Slavic, is the conservative Slavic sacred language used by the Orthodox Church in Bulgaria, Russia, Belarus, Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, North Macedonia, Ukraine, Poland, the Czech Republic and Slovakia, Slovenia and Croatia. The language appears also in the services of the American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Diocese and occasionally in the services of the Orthodox Church in America. It was also used by the Orthodox Churches in Romanian lands until the late 17th and early 18th centuries as well as by Roman Catholic Croats in the Early Middle Ages. It is also co-used by Greek Catholic Churches, which are under Roman communion, in Slavic countries, for example the Croatian, Slovak and Ruthenian Greek Catholics, as well as by the Roman Catholic Church (Croatian and Czech recensions, see below).

In addition, Church Slavonic is used by some churches which consider themselves Orthodox but are not in communion with the Orthodox Church, such as the Macedonian Orthodox Church, the Montenegrin Orthodox Church, the Russian True Orthodox Church and others. The Russian Old Believers and the Co-Believers also use Church Slavonic.