MATERIAL: Copper
TYPE: Manuscript
DIMENSIONS: 5 cm x 17 cm (each plate) 8.8 cm (exterior diameter of ring including boss)
COMPONENTS: 3 plates; ring
Inscription Translation: Translation: May all be well ! {Vishnuvardhana who adorned} the family of the illustrious Chalukyas who belong to the Manavya gotra praised by the whole world, who are Haritiputras, who had obtained royal power through the favour of Kaushiki’s husband, who are protected by the group of the Mother Goddesses, who had obtained their boar-insignia through the favour of the blessed Narayana ... who had purified their bodies by bathing at the completion [of the Horse Sacrifice] ... {— his son was} the great king [Jayasinha ?]vallabha [= Jayasinha I], who obtained with his polity, modesty and valour … — his dear brother was Indra Bhattaraka [ = Indravarman I] — his [son] was the illustrious great king Vishnuvardhana [II], who perfumed the whole horizon with the fragrance of ... , whose intellect was pure and broad [due to?] the mastering of various disciplines, who was adorned by such merits as generosity, nobility, fortitude etc. — his dear son Vijayasiddhi [ = Mangi Yuvaraja Sarvalokashraya], endowed with virtues and power, in the application of logic and other sciences ... {his feet reddened by the rays of} many jewels broken from (?) the diadems of enemy kings forced to bow down by wielding his sword … (Side E contained the text of the donation, but it is too damaged to decipher.) (On side D the text of the donation continues, still mostly illegible, the only thing I can make out is "together with a flower garden". The second half of this side is legible again:) Many have given land and many have preserved it. Whoever owns the land at a particular time, that person has its fruit then. One who takes away land, whether given by himself or given by another, shall be reborn in faeces as a worm for sixty thousand years. (Then there seems to be some information about the scribe, but unfortunately it is not legible.)
ITEM ID: 542

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Copperplate Land Grant (Mangi Yuvaraja)

DATE
Year: 694
Decade: 680s
Century: 7th (601-700)

A Copperplate land grant of Mangi Yuvaraja (r. c. 682-706) from South India, Andhra Pradesh c. 682-702 AD. This is probably a grant of the Eastern Cāḷukya king Maṅgi Yuvarāja (aka Vijayasiddhi and Sarvalokāśraya r. c. 682–706) whose kingdom was in what is today Andhra Pradesh in South India. The script is the one found on seventh-eighth century copper plates of the same dynasty (cf. e.g. Epigraphia Indica VIII, pp. 236ff.), the precursor of the Telugu-Kannada alphabet. The seal bears the legend Śrī-Vijayasiddhi in the middle, below it there is a lotus flower and above the legend there is the crescent moon between two objects that might be daggers. The plates should be read in the sequence B C E D.

Inscription Translation: Translation: May all be well! (Vishnuvardhana who adorned) the family of the illustrious Chalukyas who belong to the Manavya gotra praised by the whole world, who are Haritiputras, who had obtained royal power through the favour of Kaushiki’s husband, who are protected by the group of the Mother Goddesses, who had obtained their boar- insignia through the favour of the blessed Narayana… who had purified their bodies by bathing at the completion [of the Horse Sacrifice] … (- his son was) the great king [Jayasinha?]vallabha [= Jayasinha I], who obtained with his polity, modesty and valour… — his dear brother was Indra Bhattaraka [= Indravarman I] – his [son] was the illustrious great king Vishnuvardhana [lI], who perfumed the whole horizon with the fragrance of …, whose intellect was pure and broad [due to?] the mastering of various disciplines, who was adorned by such merits as generosity, nobility, fortitude etc. — his dear son Vijayasiddhi [= Mangi Yuvaraja Sarvalokashraya], endowed with virtues and power, in the application of logic and other sciences … {his feet reddened by the rays of) many jewels broken from (?) the diadems of enemy kings forced to bow down by wielding his sword.

Side E contained the text of the donation, but it is too damaged to decipher.)

(On side D the text of the donation continues, still mostly illegible, the only thing I can make out is “together with a flower garden”. The second half of this side is legible again:) Many have given land and many have preserved it. Whoever owns the land at a particular time, that person has its fruit then. One who takes away land, whether given by himself or given by another, shall be reborn in faeces as a worm for sixty thousand years. (Then there seems to be some information about
the scribe, but unfortunately it is not legible.)