TYPE: Manuscript
CONDITION: Some corners are missing, (did not notice on my first inspection, since the pages were stuck together)
NOTES: It is an 18th century. At the bottom of some of the pages are dates, some 67, some 68. whenever he speaks about current time, or our time as he mentions, it is the year 1768. Finally, the paper is XVIII century.
ITEM ID: 473
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Cronologia (Manuscript on Time)

DATE
Year: 1768
Decade: 1760s
Century: 18th (1701-1800)

A manuscript about Time in red and black ink, written in 1767 and 1768 including some folding tables. It may be an original work, since it makes reference to 1768 as “our time.” It also dates each section with the date when the author wrote it.

According to scholar Gonzalo Sec, “This book is a history of the division of time with tables to calculate with precision the dates for the several Catholic liturgies in future years (pentecostés, Corpus Cristi, etc.), when the sun rises and hides in several areas of the world, and other elements related with time. It is quite an interesting source. I will keep it in mind.

There is no reference to the author or place. I think that is the information crossed out on the first page.

Beginning and progress of the ecclesiastical computations, with some information about the time in antiquity that resulted in the last and adequate composition of the time of October 10, 1582 by order of the Saint Father Gregory XIII for the adjustment of the Roman Church in its mobile festivities and celebration of the Pascua (Easter). This computation is illustrated with human news, sacred and abundant tables that facilitate the intelligence of such a valuable and necessary faculty.

By the way, at the end of the text it says: Finished the 28th of June, 1778.”