MATERIAL: Printed
TYPE: Book
DIMENSIONS: 9.5" x 6.5" x 2"
COMPONENTS: two volumes; This is the 7th volume of the set. Original leather with rubbed title labels on the spine, as shown with some gilt and red leather label still visible, the hinges holding.
CONDITION: Text pleasantly browned with a few stains, signed in pencil on front pastedown.
priceInfo: I have just bought parts of the first Bible ever printed in Mexico and then a complete set of the second version printed in Mexico dated 1835. I have recently acquired two volumes from the first Bible printed in Mexico and Latin America dated 1831-1833, and then a complete copy ( all 17 volumes) of the second version printed in Mexico in 1835.  Please add these to both our Bible collection and our Latin American Collection. Now one of the two is a Protestant text, the other Catholic, and I’m still not positive which is which, though I believe the 1835 version is the first one approved by the Catholic Church, but I will do more research to make certain. 
Foreign Language Inscription: Sagrada Biblia, en latin y español, con notas literales, críticas é históricas, prefacios y disertacione. Méjico : Imprenta de Galvan a cargo de Mariano Arévalo, 1831. [v. 7. Paralipomenos] 1st Ed.
ITEM ID: 3511
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First Bible printed in Mexico & Latin America (Two Volumes)

DATE
Decade: 1830s
Century: 19th (1801-1900)
Notes: 1831-1833 

The first Bible printed on Latin American soil was the Venice Bible, translated from the French version of Vence and published in Mexico between 1831 and 1833. This is the 7th volume of the set. This version had two columns per page, one in Spanish and the other in Latin, and consisted of 25 volumes.A Spanish version of a French Bible sometimes known as the “Bible de Vence.” This edition is the earliest Bible printed in Mexico. It is based on a Bible published in 25 volumes at Paris in 1820-1824. Language is diglot in both Spanish and Latin. The preface, addressed “A la Iglesia Mejicana”, is signed by Mariano Galvan Rivera, who is described elsewhere as the proprietor of the translation. With elaborate prolegomena, dissertations, prefaces, tables, etc, along with the complete Book of Paralipomenon ( Books of the Chronicles, also called (in early Roman Catholic translations into English) Paralipomenon I And Ii,  two Old Testament books that were originally part of a larger work that included the books of Ezra and Nehemiah. These three (Ezra and Nehemiah were one book in the Jewish canon) were the final books of the Hebrew Bible. Together they survey Israel’s history from Adam to the activity of Ezra and Nehemiah in the period after the Babylonian Exile (6th century bc). The uniformity of language, style, and ideas marks the work as the product of a single author, known as the Chronicler, who probably lived about 350–300 bc.. The material of the Chronicles lists genealogies from Adam to King Saul (1 Chronicles 1–2) and covers the death of Saul and the reign of King David (1 Chronicles 10–29), the reign of King Solomon (2 Chronicles 1–9), and from the division of the monarchy into the northern and southern kingdoms to the end of the Babylonian Exile (2 Chronicles 10–36).)