ORIGINAL TITLE Title: Reglas de orthographia, diccionario, y arte del idioma othomi
MATERIAL: Vellum
TYPE: Book
COMPONENTS: Engraved table leaf. [24], 160 pages.
CONDITION: Small 8vo, contemporary vellum, minor wear; lacking frontispiece plate, moderate damp staining, lacking a bit of text on leaf F8; early inscription on front end paper.
NOTES: First edition. A dictionary of the Otomi language, spoken near Mexico City. "The author was the first to establish a proper system of characters, which has been since retained"--Sabin 52413. Medina, Mexico 5174; Palau 190159 ("muy rara").
REFERENCE EXTERNAL LINKS: Michael Carrasco, "It would be interesting to know how much botanical information is included in this dictionary. They have a scanned copy at the John Carter Brown Library for those that might want a closer look."

ITEM ID: 4514
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First Edition of the Dictionary of the Otomi Language

DATE
Year: 1767
Decade: 1760s
Century: 18th (1701-1800)

Otomi is an Oto-Manguean language spoken by about 240,000 people in Central Mexico, especially in the states of México, Puebla, Veracruz, Hidalgo, Guanajuato, Querétaro, Tlaxcala and Michoacán.

There are many different dialects of Otomi, some of which are mutually unintelligible, and each one has a different native name for the language, including: Hñähnü, Hñähño, Hñotho, Hñähü, Hñätho, Yųhų, Yųhmų, Ñųhų, Ñǫthǫ and Ñañhų. Most of these mean “speak well”. The name Otomi comes from the Nahuatl otomitl, which is thought to come from totomitl (shooter of birds).

Otomi was first written by Spanish friars after the Spanish conquered Mexico during the 16th century. The friars taught Otomi speakers to write their own language using the Latin alphabet, and several books were composed using their spelling system. The language in which they were written is known as Classical Otomi. Since then many Otomi have abandoned their language and switched to Spanish, partly due to negative stereotypes about them perpetuated by Nahuatl and Spanish speakers. Attitudes began to change in 2003, however, when Otomi gained recognition as a national language of Mexico along with 61 other indigenous languages.

ARTISTS
Name: Luis de Neve, y Molina,
Type: Author