ORIGINAL TITLE Title: Atlas pintoresco e historico de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos por Antonio Garcia Cubas divisiones politica, etnografica y eclesiástica
PRONUNCIATION: Atlas pintoresco e historico de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos por Antonio Garcia Cubas divisiones politica, etnografica y eclesiástica
TYPE: Atlas
DIMENSIONS: Atlas-Oblong double elephant folio (66 x 85.5 cm).
COMPONENTS: Atlas is comprised of 13 double-page chromolithographed maps, each of which is a specialized map of Mexico surrounded by individual lithograph vignettes corresponding to the maps, such as archaeology, botany, rivers, mining, volcanoes and mountains, railroads, costumed ethnographic types, etc.. The title page bound in the Atlas is a partial facsimile, but an original disbound title page is included. Quarter leather with green cloth binding; spine in seven compartments. Octavo with quarter leather binding and marble board, includes title page, iv + 474 pp. and 3 pages of index and errata. Spine in five compartments with gold stamped title.
CONDITION: In very good condition.
NOTES: The most beautiful and important Atlas ever published in Mexico along with an extra original title page and the accompanying octavo volume of text. Rarely sold as a set, the text is a wonderful companion piece to this beautiful atlas. Stunning and unusual atlas of Mexico.
ITEM ID: 4551
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Folio Atlas and Accompanying Octavo Volume of Text

DATE
Year: 1885
Decade: 1880s
Century: 19th (1801-1900)

First edition of one of the most colorful of nineteenth-century Mexican color-plate books, prepared by Garcia y Cubas, known as the father of Mexican cartography.

The accompanying Octavo volume of text is a wonderful companion piece to this beautiful atlas. It goes into extensive detail of each individual map including historical and cultural information, geographic descriptions and demographics

Maps guide:

[1] Carta Politica. A political map with an inset chart showing population and size of the states. Fifty-five Mexican bust portraits at top show statesmen and heroes, including Iturbide, Hidalgo, Morelos, Matamoros, Mina, Santa-Anna, Almonte, Maximillian, and Juarez. Eleven views of architecture include Chapultepec, the national and municipal palaces in Mexico City, and the state palaces at Guadalajara, San Luis Potosi, Xalapa, Veracruz, Merida, Morelia, Oaxaca, and Morelos.

[2] Carta Etnografica. This ethnographic map shows the distribution of indigenous tribes (a few of which extend into the United States. The map has an inset chart of the different races including “whites,” indigenous people, and “mexclada.” The number of members of each indigenous group is charted. The map is surrounded by twenty-six brightly colored lithographs of people of the various regions, including Veracruz, San Luis Potosi, Michoacan, Chiapas, Yucatan, Oaxaca, Tabasco, Chihuahua (“civilized Apaches”), etc. Some of the images relate to social activities, such as the jarabe (Mexican hat dance), “raza blanca” (European dances), “baile fantastico” (wild dance at religious festival), and wedding dance. Occupational types are shown, such as hacendados. Very beautiful images with excellent documentary value. Not in the costume bibliographies.

[3] Carta Eclesiastica. The map divides the nation into bishoprics and presents symbols, such as crosses for archdiocesan offices, etc. The twenty images around the map depict selected churches and a few interiors of those edifices.

[4] Vias de Comunicacion y Movimiento Maritimo. This dynamic map highlights transportation and communication systems for the country, and includes eight steamboats at sea. The fifteen surrounding lithographs depict drawings of train tracks, ports, and numerous bridges. The plate offers useful information while documenting Mexico’s serious embracement of technology.

[5] Instruccion Publica. Mexico’s educational system and museums are highlighted, and a chart shows the number of persons who attend school in various states. At the top are over eighty bust portraits of scholars, teachers, literary men, scientists, etc., including Sor Juana de la Cruz (poetess), Alzate y Ramirez (astronomer and publisher), Siguenza y Gongara (engineer), Ramos Arizpe (orator), Escalante (caricaturist). The lithos around the map include the National Library (with 200,000 volumes), Law School, School of Fine Arts (paintings on exhibit), Salon of Zoology, Schools of Music, Engineering, etc.

[6] Carta Orografica. The map presents Mexican topography and includes a composite view of the relative heights of mountains and volcanoes. Thirteen beautiful lithographs around the map show mountains, volcanoes, and caves of the nation (Popocatepetl, Orizaba, Iztaccihuatl, etc.)

[7] Carta Hidrografica. The water system of Mexico is illustrated, the boundaries showing the various areas in which rivers drain. An inset map shows the relative length of the rivers throughout the country. Patterns of currents are indicated in the oceans. The map is surrounded by sixteen lovely lithographs of the rivers, waterfalls, and lakes (landscape scene of Colorado River at Sonora and California, waterfall of Regla, underground river in Campeche, etc.).

[8] Carta Agricola. The map has colored symbols to indicate agricultural crops in Mexico, and at left is a composite illustration showing the foliage that grows at different altitudes throughout the country. Surrounding the map are twelve lithographs of flora, haciendas, farms, and agricultural scenes (Soapayuca Hacienda de Pulque, ranching scene at San Luis Potosi, aqueduct at Hidalgo, etc.). Large lithographs on the side present various botanical specimens in Mexico.

[9] Carta Minera. An inset chart on this mining map shows the production of gold and silver, total value in pesos taken from 1537-1882 and amount taken since Independence. Colored symbols on the map indicate location of various minerals. Fifteen surrounding views show mines and mining towns.

[10] Carta Historica y Arqueologica. The map, which has an inset locating the extent of the Nahua in the Valley of Mexico, locates the historical and archeological sites around the country. The map is surrounded by ten illustrations of primary archeological ruins and artifacts (Teotihuacan, Mitla, Uxmal, Chichen-Itza, Palenque, etc.). See note from Getty Exhibition at end of this description.

[11] Reyno de la Nueva Espana a Principios del Siglo XIX. This map of New Spain includes a table indicating population and size of the various states and measures 31 x 39 cm (neat line to neat line). The map extends farther north than the previous maps of Mexico in this atlas (to just north of Cape San Sebastian in Southern Oregon), reflecting the earlier possessions of Mexico. Included is the Transmississippi West and all of Texas (labelled Provincia de Tejas, when Texas was part of the Intendencia de San Luis Potosi). “Nueva California” is depicted as a narrow coastal strip, indicating that the region of the modern state of California was still largely unexplored in the Spanish era, due to its history of weak Spanish political control and remoteness from the United States. Above the map is the elaborate shield of the Spanish arms, and below are the arms of Bourbon and Austria. At center below is a large illustration of the main plaza of Mexico with the famous statue of Carlos IV. Around the map are ninety-three portraits of notable religious and secular persons in Mexican history, including two women (Queen Isabella and Dona Marina). Among the portraits are California missionary Father Junipero Serra and Conde Bernardo de Galvez, who aided the United States in its Revolutionary War and for whom Galveston, Texas, is named.

[12] Valle de Mexico. The map on this plate is a topographical map of the Valley of Mexico showing roads, towns, and features (neat line to neat line: 29 x 18.7 cm). Ten dramatic landscape scenes surround the map, including two panoramic views of Mexico from the north and south, the Belen paper mill, Chalco Canal, Chapultepec, the woods of Chapultepec, public canal and waterworks, etc.

[13] Mexico y sus cercanias. This map is irregular in shape (approximately 35 x 37 cm neat line to neat line). Presented are the regions immediately surrounding Mexico City. An inset map shows Chapultepec and its topography and other features. The fourteen surrounding lithographs present noteworthy features of Mexico City itself, including statues of Carlos IV and Columbus, Molina del Rey, National Theatre, Avenue of Famous Men with horse-drawn trolleys, Rio Hondo with steam train passing in foreground, etc.

ARTISTS
Name: Antonio García Cubas
Type: Author
Artists Dates: 1832-1912
Artist Information: Antonio Garcia Cubas was a Mexican geographer, mapmaker, writer and publisher. He is known for publishing the first atlas of Mexico. 'The maps and illustrations bordering them are superb. García Cubas was the preeminent Mexican cartographer of the nineteenth century' -- Rumsey 2693; Phillips, Atlases, 2686.
Name: Publicado por Debray Sucesores
Type: Publisher
Artist Information: Publisher of the Atlas
Name: Oficina Tip. de la Secretaria de Fomento
Type: Publisher
Artist Information: Publisher of the Octavo