MATERIAL: Paper
TYPE: Manuscript
DIMENSIONS: 192 x 160 mm
COMPONENTS: Text for chants in red and black, notes reminiscent of neumes, but using the more modern five-line staff rather than the four lined staff of the neumatic system. Blindstamped calf over beveled boards, remnant of one clasp; extensive notations to end-papers in Old Russian.
CONDITION: Thumb-soiling, occasional staining, front fly-leaf nearly detached, spine perished, upper cover detached, edges rubbed with some loss to calf at corners and clasps.
NOTES: Provenance: Prof. & Mrs. Karl H. Menges (book label). Karl Menges [1908-1999] was professor at Columbia University and an authority on the languages of the Central Asian people in the Soviet Union.
ITEM ID: 5653
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Liturgical Manuscript – Irmalogion

DATE
Year: 1798
Decade: 1790s
Century: 18th (1701-1800)

Slavonic liturgical manuscript on paper.

Beautifully executed manuscript Irmalogion, a liturgical work of the Russian Orthodox church based upon the works of St. John of Damascus, executed by scribe Abbot Aristarch of Bogoljubovo Monastery, with his notation to front fly-leaf.

The Svyato-Bogolyubsky Monastery was originally founded by Grand Prince Andrey Bogolyubsky in 1158 when he had his residence built in Bogolyubovo. After the murder of Andrey Bogolyubsky and then the sack of Bogolyubovo in 1177 by Grand Prince Gleb Rostislavich of Ryazan and in 1238 by the Mongol Tatars, the monastery faced hard times but remained open. It was only in the late 17th century that new construction work took place, which was followed by larger-scale construction in the 18th and 19th centuries.

After the Revolution the monastery remained open until 1923 and in the following year the monastery’s buildings and property were given over to be used as a museum. It was only in 1991 that the monastery was reopened and in 1997 it was also decided to establish a convent as part of the monastery.