Original Title: Philosophy according to the infallible and firm theology of Saint Thomas [Acquinas] divided into four volumes'
TYPE: Book
COMPONENTS: Vol. 3 of 4. 686 numbered pages and many drawings and fold outs relating to geography and astronomy. This copy still has it's original 18th century binding.
NOTES: Voskanian 511, 513.
ITEM ID: 216
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Physics, Part II (Volume 3 of 4)

DATE
Year: 1750
Decade: 1750s
Century: 18th (1701-1800)

According to scholar Sebouh Aslanian at UCLA, “This book is a philosophical work, published in Venice in 1750. The title is as follows: ‘Philosophy according to the infallible and firm theology of Saint Thomas [Acquinas] divided into four volumes’. It was translated from a French work by a priest named Father Antoin of Paris by the mkhitarist priest Father Vrtanes of Constantinople, a disciple of abbot Mekhitar of Sebaste. I think this must be Father Vrtanes Asligian. It is Vol. 3, embracing ‘Physics, Part II’, of a four-volume Philosophy ‘according to the unerring and faultless teaching of St. Thomas’ by Fr. Antony of Paris. The contents seem comparatively modern to me (presenting solar systems according to Ptolemy and Colernicus but also presenting a technologically advanced-looking mechanical instrument that could not have existed in Aquinas’ time). This copy still has it’s original 18th century binding , 686 numbered pages and many drawings and foldouts relating to geography and astronomy.”

According to scholar Haig Utidjian, “It is Vol. 3, embracing “Physics, Part II”, of a four-volume Philosophy “according to the unerring and faultless teaching of St. Thomas” by Fr. Antony of Paris? I suspect St. Thomas is Aquinas, but I am not sure who Fr. Antony is. The contents seem comparatively modern to me (presenting solar systems according to Ptolemy and Colernicus but also presenting a technologically advanced-looking mechanical instrument that could not have existed in Aquinas’ time). The translator is a pupil of Mekhitar of Sebaste, Fr. Vrt’anēs of Constantinople.”

ARTISTS
Name: Father Antoin of Paris
Type: Author
Name: Father Vrtanes of Constantinople
Type: Translator