MATERIAL: Paper
TYPE: Manuscript
DIMENSIONS: 24 cm x 20 cm.
COMPONENTS: 1 sheet; signed document. Manuscript in black ink.
priceInfo: Martin stayed in Mexico for very short time: from 1562 to 1567; so you can imagine why documents from him made in Mexico are so rare. There is apparently only one sales record of a document signed by him. The document was also a payment receipt from 1564. It was sold in a Mexican auction house for $120,000.00 Mexican Pesos in 2014 (At that time, that amount was roughly $8,000 USD, now is like $6,800-7,000). This is truly an item worthy of a museum.
Foreign Language Inscription: Pedro Briseño de los dineros que son a vuestro cargo, dad a Navarro despensero catorce pesos y cinco tomines y medio de tipuzque que monto el gasto de mi despensa de cada domingo y tomad su carta de pago que con ella y esta mando que os reciban
Inscription Translation: Pedro Briseño of the money that is under your charge, pay Navarro 14 pesos and 5 tomines and a half of tipuzque (pesos, tomines and tipuzque all refer to coins denominations); quantity that is an expense for my pantry of every Sunday. Take from him his payment receipt
ITEM ID: 4309
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Record of Payment by Martin Cortéz

DATE
Year: 1564
Decade: 1560s
Century: 16th (1501-1600)
Notes: July 16, 1564

Martín Cortés, son of Hernán Cortés and Juana de Zúñiga, was perhaps the first Mexican (Spanish that was born in the New Spain). When Hernán Cortes died, Martín inherited all. He was called the Second Marquis of the Valley of Oaxaca and he was granted all the villas, haciendas and land of his father. He lived in Spain contracting marriage with Ana Ramirez de Arellano. In Spain, he met on a regular basis with nobles, knights, poets and rich merchants that treated as if he were the king. Upon his return to the New Spain in 1562, people received him everywhere with parties Although no chronicler indicates whether D. Martín’s return to Mexico was casual or meditated, it is also known that his two bastard brothers also came from Spain: D. Martín (son of D. Hernán and la Malinche) and D. Luis Cortes (son of the conqueror and Ana de Hermosilla). Already established in the New Spain, Martin Cortes became famous for his tremendous splurge of money, daily he gave great parties.

However, Martin Cortes quickly catched up with the rising discountent of his peers (mainly the sons of the Conquerors that had inherited lands and slaves: The Encomenderos). The king wanted to take away their land, and strip them of the Indians that worked for them.

Then the discontent arose, the sons of the encomenderos had heard complaints to a king: who wanted to take away their lands won with so much effort, to strip them of the Indians that worked for them. That would mean the end for the Encomiendas. This led to the plan of the first serious rebellion that the Creoles would attempt. merchants that treated as if he were the king. Upon his return to the New Spain in 1562, people received him everywhere with parties. Although no chronicler indicates whether D. Martín’s return to Mexico was casual or meditated, it is also known that his two bastard brothers also came from Spain: D. Martín (son of D. Hernán and la Malinche) and D. Luis Cortes (son of the conqueror and Ana de Hermosilla). Already established in the New Spain, Martin Cortes became famous for his tremendous splurge of money, daily he gave great parties.

However, Martin Cortes quickly catched up with the rising discountent of his peers (mainly the sons of the Conquerors that had inherited lands and slaves: The Encomenderos). The king wanted to take away their land, and strip them of the Indians that worked for them.