MATERIAL: Hand-Written/Painted
TYPE: Scroll
DIMENSIONS: 7 1/4 X 151 inches (12 1/2 feet)
ITEM ID: 1753
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Scroll on Shinto

DATE
Notes: Late Meiji or earlier

A Izumo Fukujin and it’s origins manuscript scroll. Hand-written, handpainted scroll on Shinto religion dating to the Meiji period or ealier. There is the signature “Taishakyo” at the end.

In Japanese mythology, the Seven Lucky Gods or Seven Gods of Fortune (七福神, shichifukujin in Japanese) are believed to grant good luck and are often represented in netsuke and in artworks. One of the seven (Jurōjin) is said to be based on an historical figure.

They all began as remote and impersonal gods, but gradually became much closer canonical figures for certain professions and Japanese arts. During the course of their history, the mutual influence between gods has created confusion about which of them was the patron of certain professions. The worship of this group of gods is also due to the importance of the number seven in Japan, supposedly a signifier of good luck.

According to scholar, Mark Teeuwen, “Something to do with the infamous 祭神論争 and the establishment of Izumo Oyashirokyo in 1882?!”

There is the signature “Taishakyo” at the end.