ORIGINAL TITLE Title: Kithvei HaKodesh
PRONUNCIATION: Kithvei HaKodesh
TYPE: Bible
COMPONENTS: I: ff. (4), 389. II: ff. 359. Complete in two volumes. Titles within typographical arabesque borders, half-titles, divisional titles. With vocalization points (nikud). Hebrew and Judeo-Spanish (Ladino) printed in parallel columns.
CONDITION: Foxed and stained in places, two leaves of Mishlei remargined. Contemporary boards (not uniform). Large 4to.
NOTES: From the library of the late Haham Solomon Gaon.

Solomon Gaon was born in Travnik, Yugoslavia in 1912 and studied at the yeshiva in Sarajevo. Both his parents were murdered in the Holocaust. He received his rabbinic ordination from Jews' College in London. In 1949 he became Haham (Chief Rabbi) of the Sephardic congregations of the British Commonwealth.

After moving to New York, Rabbi Gaon was also connected with the Spanish and Portuguese Congregation Shearith Israel. In 1968 Rabbi Gaon delivered the main address at the dedication of the first synagogue consecrated in Spain since the Expulsion of the Jews in 1492.

He became a professor at Yeshiva University in 1976, and founded and directed the Jacob E. Safra Institute of Sephardic Studies. He served as president of the Union of Sephardic Congregations of the United States and Canada. He was the principal representative of the Sephardic people at the March 31, 1992 event at the Beth Yaacov synagogue in Madrid, during which King Juan Carlos of Spain revoked the 1492 Edict of Expulsion. Haham Rabbi Gaon received Spain's Prince of Asturias Award in 1992 for his lifetime of efforts seeking a renewal of relationships between and among the Sephardim and the Spanish people. In 1991, he presided when Jewish services were held for the first time in 500 years in Zaragoza, Spain.

Vinograd, Izmir 91; Yaari, Izmir 75; Darlow & Moule 5192.
ITEM ID: 5485
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Complete Jewish Bible

DATE
Year: 1838
Decade: 1830s
Century: 19th (1801-1900)

Complete in two volumes.

Sometimes called “Spaniolish,” Ladino is the Spanish-Jewish dialect spoken by Sephardic Jews. Ladino’s origins are similar to those of Yiddish, in that they both combine Hebrew and local language(s).

As the Ladino language developed during the 15th and 16th centuries, it grew to include Arabic, Turkish, Greek, French and Italian. Ladino spread throughout the Mediterranean after Jews were expelled from in 1492, and is currently spoken by about 160,000 Jews in Turkey, the Balkans, North Africa, Israel and the Americas. But because of the recent trend among Sephardic Jews to adapt local languages in place of traditional ones, Ladino is now in decline.

There are several subtle differences between Ladino and Spanish. In Spanish, the name for god is “Dios,” which ends in “s,” implicating that there are several gods. But in Ladino, god is consistently called “El Dio,” or “the god.” Similarly, instead of using the Spanish term Domingo (which translates to “god’s day”) for Sunday, Ladino employs “Alhat,” an Arabic word meaning one.