MATERIAL: Woodblock Printed
TYPE: Print Book (Set)
DIMENSIONS: 5 X 7 inches (each volume - closed)
COMPONENTS: 7 volume set
NOTES: Early and rare. This is the only example I have owned or seen of this rare early set by a young Yoshitoshi.
REFERENCE EXTERNAL LINKS: "Tōkaidōchū Hizakurige" (Shark Mare) Wiki

"Tōkaidōchū Hizakurige" (Shark Mare) an English translation.

ITEM ID: 1277
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Yoshitoshi Print Book Set

DATE
Decade: 1870s
Century: 19th (1801-1900)

Print book set by Yoshitoshi on the Tokaido Road.

This is an illustrated version of a popular novel. Tōkaidōchū Hizakurige (東海道中膝栗毛), abbreviated as Hizakurige and known in translation as Shank’s Mare, is a comic picaresque novel (kokkeibon) written by Jippensha Ikku (十返舎一九, 1765–1831) about the misadventures of two travelers on the Tōkaidō, the main road between Kyoto and Edo during the Edo period. The book was published in twelve parts between 1802 and 1822.

The two main characters, traveling from Edo to Kyoto on their pilgrimage to Ise Grand Shrine, are called Yajirobē (彌次郎兵衛) and Kitahachi (喜多八). The book, while written in a comical style, was written as a traveler’s guide to the Tōkaidō Road. It details famous landmarks at each of the 53 post towns along the road, where the characters, often called Yaji and Kita, frequently find themselves in hilarious situations. They travel from station to station, predominantly interested in food, sake, and women. As Edo men, they view the world through an Edo lens, deeming themselves more cultured and savvy in comparison to the countrymen they meet.

Hizakurige is comic novel that also provides information and anecdotes regarding various regions along the Tōkaidō. Tourism was booming during the Edo Period, when this was written. This work is one of many guidebooks that proliferated, to whet the public’s appetite for sight-seeing.

A second book was also written, called Zoku Hizakurige, which includes material on the Kiso Valley, Konpira, and Miyajima.

Some of the episodes from this novel have been illustrated by famous ukiyo-e artists, such as Hiroshige in his One Hundred Views of Edo.

The woodblock prints inside are well done and very humorous. The woodblock of the race track is reminiscent of the work of Degas, who was influenced by these woodblock prints.

According to Jos Vos, “This is an illustrated version of a once popular novel.”

According to R Shaldjian Morrison, “Several film adaptations have been made too. and there’s a full English translation by Thomas Satchell.”

ARTISTS
Name: Yoshitoshi
Type: Artist
Artist Information: Yoshitoshi (1839-1892) was a Japanese artist who is widely recognized as the last great master of the ukiyo-e genre of woodblock printing and painting. His reputation has continued to grow both in the West and among younger Japanese, and he is now almost universally recognized as the greatest Japanese artist of his era.